Haggis tasting notes, and whisky pairings

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The Olivebank Haggis, Island Nation o Stronsay, Orkney

It’s a common misconception that aal haggis is the same. Nothing could be further fae the truth. As always, we aim tae promote cultural diversity – wae a peedie bit o positive northern chauvinism thrown in for good measure. This month, Brisknortherly brings you tasting notes tae three classic haggises o the north.

Haggis #1 – George Donaldson and Sons, Kirkwall, Orkney

Generations o Orcadians hiv been browt up on Donaldsons’ haggis. This is an exceptionally light haggis, wae a very high oatmeal content – meaning the haggis can be fluffed wae a fork. The colour is light, and the morsels o meat dotted among the oatmeal mean the cooked product has a bonny speckled appearance, like the breist o a Mistlethrush. The flavour is mild – as haggises go – but rich nevertheless. Donaldson’s is an outstandingly good haggis, made tae an owld family recipe. If you are new tae haggis, this is the ideal introduction. Serve wae clapshot, and pair wae Scapa the Orcadian single malt – because a refined pudding deserves a polite whisky.

Haggis #2 – George Cockburn and Son, Dingwall, Highland

This Hieland haggis is especially moist and mealy, wae powerful aromas o gravy and caramelised onion. High oatmeal content again maks for a haggis that is faer lighter and moister than supermarket haggises, or indeed the styles o haggis typically prepared in southern Scotland. (Brisknortherly’s advice is never tae buy a supermarket haggis.) Cockburn’s semolina-textured haggis has been judged the world’s best, proving ye don’t even need tae drive sooth o Inverness tae sample the cream o the crop. Serve this noble baest wae clapshot, mince and gravy (yes, a peedie bit o mince and gravy is traditional wae haggis!) and pair wae Laphroaig for a bit o complementary paet reek.

Haggis #3 – Maurice Williamson, Isle o Stronsay, Orkney

And this ane is completely different again! A denser haggis, wae cheust the right balance o cloves (more cloves than Donaldson’s or Cockburn’s, BTW, so a sweeter flavour) and a generous dash o white pepper that’s verging on pungent, but doesna owerstep the mark. An exotic pork haggis, Williamson’s honest sonsie face when boiled and drained luks like a marble boulder. Cut it open, and the pork heart nuggets inside are sweet chocolate chips in a plum duff. This is yet anither very fine haggis, fae a plucky, independent producer in a properly peripheral place. Fair fa ye, Olivebank butchers! Serve wae mashed tatties and a dram o Owld Pulteney – salt tae go wae the pepper 🙂

 

Last night in Tokyo – Japan Diary Part Three

We are a merry company, twelve Japanese and two Scots working our way through the thronging Tokyo streets to the tavern at Myogadani. The November evening is wet, but the weather can’t dampen our spirits. The tavern is simple, the food honest, and the company warm.

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In the tavern at Myogadani

The celebration is to mark the end of a rich and wonderful visit to Japan. Our companions are members of the Japan Scotland Society and the Tokyo Caledonia Society, and all speak excellent English.

A tiny waitress appears with a huge bottle of saki. She fills a glass in front of me until it can hold no more. The diners laugh and cheer as I stand up and do my best to sup the saki without spilling. Osamu, our kind host in Tokyo, makes a short speech, and I make a short reply. We begin our banquet of tempura shrimp, fried chicken, smoked Pacific fish, and crisp edamame.

The group is deeply interested in Scotland. Most have travelled there, some of them frequently. One lady spent a winter in Orkney, and speaks English with an Orkney accent. Some of the others enjoy Scottish country dancing. They ken lots aboot malt whisky. One of the ladies specialises in origami, and presents Linda with three beautiful, delicate paper girls, dressed in traditional kimonos. We learn some of the rules of Tanka and Haiku.

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Origami lasses

The following morning, Yuko takes us to the Meiji shrine at Shibuya. This is the perfect place to relax after a busy week. There are weddings taking place at the shrine, and children’s confirmations. Here, we see peedie lasses in real kimonos, brilliant in the crisp November sunshine. Tokyo is a magnificent city, and our friends have been so kind. We long to return.

November 14th and 15th, 2015

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Kimono lass

 

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Linda and Yuko at the Meiji Shrine